Lost Season Five (2009)

Composed by Michael Giacchino

Season 5 of Lost might be the most over-the-top season of the show, thought it is still greatly entertaining. The plotlines go all over the place, for reasons I will explain once I get into spoilers. I find this to be the in the bottom third of my season rankings. It’s not bad, just not as great. Giacchino’s music also seemed to be affected for the fifth season. I think the issue was that 2009 was the year where he started taking on major film score assignments. While scoring Lost, he was also creating scores for the Star Trek reboot and Pixar’s beloved Up. His creative energies seem to have flowed more to these properties, and understandably so. While season 5 of Lost has some new concepts and a couple new characters, Giacchino could easily just insert his pre-established material.

Even on album, parts of Giacchino’s music are lifted whole or nearly wholesale from previous cues. This creates a lack of originality in places and makes avid listeners wonder why a few of the more unique pieces were not chosen for album space. The trade-off is that season 5’s album is the most thematically cohesive. The themes for Locke, Ben, and Jack are prominent throughout the disc and two of the main themes also recur fairly regularly. As for new themes and motifs, this season still has a good amount. The only one to have a lasting impact through the remainder of the show is the mystical theme for Jacob (“Tangled Web”). The new love theme in “La Fleur” also grabbed fans’ attention. Otherwise most of the themes and motifs were singularly suited for just this season. The most memorable of these is the bomb theme (introduced in “Sawyer Jones and the Temple of Boom” at 2:44), which appears to be built out of the second phrase of the main Lost theme. Continue reading

Lost Season Four (2008)

Composed by Michael Giacchino

Season four of Lost was the shortest of the seasons at 14 episodes. The producers were actually already planning for shorter seasons, but it would have been 18 episodes. A writer’s strike had forced them to cut things down, unfortunately resulting in underdeveloped new characters. Still, it’s an engaging season where the pace really picks up. Also, the shorter runtime means that it was easier for the album producers to select highlights for a full single disc. The soundtrack for season four is where Michael Giacchino’s music reached true cinematic levels, even though the booklet shows that he still had the same number of musicians. Some of the lengthier tracks sport four or five themes in interplay with each other, and some of the action cues are able to sustain themselves beyond one or two minutes. The higher level of emotion and intensity make this the best single disc presentation of music from the series. It’s definitely the first that can safely be accessed by people who have never watched the show.

This season also introduced the Oceanic Six theme for its three-part finale. This theme appears around the album’s halfway point in “There’s No Place Like Home.” As with many of Giacchino’s theme introductions, it starts on piano and then repeats on more dramatic strings. The construction of this theme is epic, and noticeably utilizes the first six notes of the main Lost theme at the end. “Of Mice and Ben” reuses the theme with heavy percussive elements for a cliffhanger. “Can’t Kill Keamy” brings in the theme for a very stirring moment, this time with the full Lost theme as counterpoint (0:46). “Landing Party” provides a final grand iteration, this one with a heart-tingling flourish of cello at the end (2:44). This theme is so notably epic that Giacchino used it as the main emotional identity for the series finale two years later. Continue reading