Soundtrack Review: Batman Forever

Batman forever original soundtrack - elliot goldenthal.jpg

Composed by: Elliot Goldenthal

Conducted by: Jonathan Sheffer & Shirley Walker

Following complaints about the unpleasant nature of Tim Burton’s Batman Returns, Warner Brothers replaced the director of the Batman franchise with Joel Schumacher, who provided a more kid-friendly blockbuster. Heavily criticized for its overbearing neon lighting and its poor Two-Face (played way too over-the-top by Tommy Lee Jones), I rather like Batman Forever, the first film to seriously explore Bruce Wayne’s origins (although many of the scenes that would have effectively explained this plotline were unfortunately cut from the film) Michael Keaton’s replacement, Val Kilmer, does a fine job as Batman, Jim Carrey turns in a delightful, if over-the-top, performance as the Riddler, and Elliot Goldenthal comes in to do perhaps one of his best scores.

Elliot Goldenthal is known for his dissonant fragmented style, which tends to turn off listeners. However, I find Batman Forever to be a very good effort, not to mention the most thematically complex in the franchise. Dissonant Goldenthal trademarks are found all over the place, from the wailing French horns to the loud clangs. It is a score fully appropriate for the zany atmosphere of the film, with a myriad of styles ranging from traditional orchestral pieces to circus music to waltzes.

Joel Schumacher initially wanted Goldenthal to reuse Danny Elfman’s famous Batman theme, but was convinced by the composer that such a theme would not work well in the more campy film. As a result we are given an equally good fanfare which provides much more interesting malleability, although the dark edge of Elfman’s work is somewhat lost. The new Batman theme appears in nearly every single track in a seemingly limitless number of variations. In fact, most of the themes are based around several short motifs, linking them all together in a complex web. For example, the Riddler’s four-note motif can also be found in Two-Face’s theme, and a three-note danger motif is found within several larger themes.

There are two notable secondary themes derived from the main theme. The first is a bombastic reworking amid a bunch of whirling and screeching strings and random jazzy sound effects labeled on track 11 as “Gotham City Boogie”. The second is a love theme with the end of the Batman theme put in (“Chase Noir”). The tragic background and stories of Batman and his newly-acquired sidekick Robin are provided with a melancholy piece. It appears ion slow strings in the quiet “Pull of Regret” and has louder moments in “Under the Top” and “Spank Me! Overture”. Its best appearance is in ‘Under the Top” where it builds up to a loud climax and then subsides into tragedy.

The villains get their own wide range of musical ideas. Two-Face is given a fairly long theme suitably played in two-note increments. It fails to convey the tragic nature of the comic’s character, but this is expected due to Tommy Lee Jones’ poor performance and the script’s propensity for one-liners. The highlight track for this theme is the waltzy “Two-Face Three-Step”. Jim Carrey’s wacky performance of the Riddler is backed by an equally absurd collection of music. Starting off with a descending four-note motif, Goldenthal puts it through so many variations and into so many melodies that it will take several listens to find all of its appearances. “Nygma Variations” is a six-minute suite for the Riddler which starts off with an ominous march and after a quiet bit of sci-fi theremin enters into a series of wacky electronic cues and the action version, which doubles the amount of notes in the theme in half the time. For moments underscoring the Riddler’s unstable emotional mind, Goldenthal uses discordant violin pieces and when the villain’s grand scheme reaches fruition uses a loud bombastic theremin.

Two tracks well worth getting mention are “Victory” and “Holy Rusted Metal”. “Victory” is my favorite because of the way it changes moods so fast while being entertaining. Two-Face’s theme loudly starts off this cue until the Batman fanfare breaks in, only to literally flop as our hero falls into a trap. The music then gets louder and louder as Batman is engulfed in flames. However, a secondary fanfare breaks out as he emerges from the flames. Goldenthal then utilizes an electronic organ as he ends up being in an even worse situation. Ending the cue is yet another recurring heroic fanfare as Robin saves Batman from his death. “Holy Rusted Metal” is notable for its grand villainous fanfare which would get a bigger treatment in the dismal sequel Batman and Robin.

How does the album do as a listening experience? There are few quiet moments, although there is a five-minute interlude in the middle consisting of “Pull of Regret’ and “Mouth to Mouth Nocturne” (a very lovely piece). But the action, while very loud and furious, isn’t the type that you enjoy for rhythms and frantic pacing. Batman Forever benefits from its large number of themes and the seemingly endless number of variations they undergo. Batman Forever is not for everyone thanks to its loud, dissonant nature and has received plenty of flack from film score reviewers. In fact, it will downright annoy many of your friends. The score album is a little hard to buy, but if you like the music, get it before it becomes even more rare. Batman Forever, in my opinion, has about equal standing with Batman Returns and is the most complex bat-score ever made thus far.

Rating: 8/10

  1. Main Titles & Fanfare (1:51)
  2. Perpetuum Mobile (0:54)
  3. The Perils of Gotham (3:01)
  4. Chase Noir (1:46)
  5. Fledermarschmusik (1:15)
  6. Nygma Variations (An Ode to Science) (6:02)
  7. Victory (2:37)
  8. Descent (1:08)
  9. Pull of Regret (2:50)
  10. Mouth to Mouth Nocturne (2:14)
  11. Gotham City Boogie (2:01)
  12. Under the Top (5:42)
  13. Mr. E’s Dance Card (Rhumba, Foxtrot, Waltz, Tango) (3:21)
  14. Two-Face Three-Step (2:20)
  15. Chase Blanc (1:23)
  16. Spank Me! Overture (2:46)
  17. Holy Rusted Metal (1:50)
  18. Batterdammerung (1:23)

Complete Score

La-La Land Records released the complete score in 2012. Frustratingly, despite providing all the music, some of the material on the first disc is out of chronological order for some unexplained reason. Regardless, there are plenty of new variations on the themes and motifs to check out. My favorite previously unreleased music is ‘Scuba Fight/Claw Island/Emperor of Madness”, which has a lot of that awesome fanfare from “Holey Rusted Metal”. Of the three complete Bat-score releases, this is the strongest, since the highlights of the Danny Elfman soundtracks were all present on the original releases anyways.

Rating: 8/10

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Soundtrack Review: Batman Returns

Composed by: Danny Elfman

Conducted by: Jonathan Scheffer

Following the smashing success of Batman, Tim Burton was given more creative freedom in the sequel. Batman Returns has good acting and great visuals, but Burton infused a little too much of his own style, resulting in a film that, reportedly, caused many children expecting a normal action film to come out of the theaters crying. For its faults, it has a pretty strong cast, with Danny Devito as an odd mutant take on the Penguin, Michelle Pfeiffer as Catwoman, and Christopher Walken being awesome as always as evil business and power mogul Max Schreck. Among the Burton tropes in Batman Returns are a circus, plenty of pale faces, gothic designs, and a dark Danny Elfman score.

The score is quite different from the first, which is more traditionally heroic. Its emphasis is on bleak darkness, as represented by its two new, liberally quoted themes. Both are sinister, but with a strong hint of tragedy. The Penguin’s theme debuts in “Birth of a Penguin” and gets extensive treatment in “The Lair” and “The Cemetery”. It’s used so often that how much you like the theme will effect how you feel about the whole album. Catwoman’s theme has two parts. The first is high-pitched strings representing the feline meowing and screeching of a cat. The second part is a more tragic motif that dominates the more sweeping portions of “Selina Transforms”. Christopher Walken’s character doesn’t get a theme despite his prominent relevance to both Penguin and Catwoman. The Batman theme itself takes a much more subdued role. Whereas the 1989 film had plenty of lengthy, heroic iterations, this one sees smaller references, often without any of the heroic brass. There is an amazing version for the opening titles, with a dark choir lending some extra gravitas and atmosphere.

“Birth of a Penguin” opens with a short, low snippet of the Batman theme before an oohing choir and an organ introduce the Penguin’s theme. The track climaxes with Elfman’s familiar “la-la” choral work to represent the film’s Christmas surroundings before “Opening Titles” takes over. The Penguin and Catwoman themes get lengthy treatments for the next few tracks, which can get tiring at points. “Batman vs. the Circus” is the first moment in the score where the hero’s theme plays out in any major way. This track starts off with a great build into the Batman theme. The rest of it is Batman’s theme battling circus music. Tracks 10 and 11 contrast two moments for the Penguin’s character. “The Rise…” starts off sinisterly, but ends with a triumphant fanfare, while “…And Fall From Grace” ends with a very tragic rendition of the Penguin’s theme.

There is no love theme this time around, since the main female interest is Selina Kyle/Catwoman, who already has plenty of her own thematic material. Elfman still delivers a twisted romance track, “Sore Spots”, which plays out like an old-time Hollywood love theme, but keeps getting intruded on by Catwoman’s high-pitched strings.

“Rooftops” moves between different tempos, starting off with more carnivalesque action music, going into dark villain territory, a choral outburst of the Batman theme, some sinister choral material, and then a few violin screeches. “Wild Chase” is another action cue where Batman’s theme battles circus music. “The Children’s Hour” is features the Penguin’s theme as a lullaby. “The Final Confrontation” kicks off with a military drumbeat. The rest of the track see the Batman and Penguin themes duke it out. “Penguin Army” (this and the next track are misnamed), sees the climax while “Selina’s Electrocution” gives the Penguin a tragic send-off. “Finale” is interesting in how it contracts with the same-named cue from the previous score. While that one was heroic and uplifting, with Batman rising to save the city, this one is unclear, tragic, and somber. The end credits suite sees all three major themes get a last play.

The album features sixty-five minutes of score and a song by some early nineties guys called the Banshees at the end entitled “Face to Face”. In a very perplexing move, the track titles are listed only on the CD, with many of the tracks renamed to fit on it! This almost takes away a point from the soundtrack merely just for giving the listener confusion about what piece of music he is listening to unless if he’s heard it while watching the film. Thankfully, the proper track listing can be found online at several places, though even then most of the last tracks are misnamed (For example, the Penguin’s somber farewell is called “Selina’s Electrocution”). There’s also a complete score release, but aside from a couple more references to the less used Batman theme, I can’t think of anything that the original album doesn’t already have.

Batman Returns is not the exciting, dark yet heroic thrill ride its predecessor was, both in film and score. The music is much more Burtonish, but this doesn’t make it bad. The new themes are strong and any faults with Elfman’s score can be chalked up to the more weird and dark atmosphere of the film. As I stated earlier, one’s opinion of the new themes can determine an opinion of the overall product. I think they’re good and encompass a wide variety of emotions with ease. The action music isn’t as good here, maybe because of all the circus and carnival material, but I think “Final Confrontation” is a great dramatic build to the film’s climax. Overall, Elfman’s Returns is a very different score, but a good one.

Rating: 8/10

Tracklisting

  1. Birth of a Penguin (2:270
  2. Opening Titles (3:09)
  3. To the Present (0:57)
  4. The Lair (4:49)
  5. Selina Kyle (1:11)
  6. Selina Transforms (4:16)
  7. The Cemetery (2:53)
  8. Cat Suite (5:41)
  9. Batman vs. the Circus (2:34)
  10. The Rise… (1:41)
  11. …and Fall from Grace (4:08)
  12. Sore Spots (2:18)
  13. Rooftops (4:19)
  14. Wild Ride (3:34)
  15. The Children’s Hour (1:47)
  16. The Final Confrontation (5:12)
  17. Penguin Army (4:54)
  18. Selina’s Electrocution (2:40)
  19. The Finale (2:19)
  20. End Credits (4:44)
  21. Face to Face (performed by the Banshees) (4:17)

Soundtrack Review: Batman (1989)

Composed by: Danny Elfman

Orchestrated by: Shirley Walker & Steve Bartek

Although he had returned to his grimmer, darker roots nearly twenty years earlier in the comics, Batman was still often perceived by the non-comic reading community as the campy crusader of the sixties TV show, battling alongside Robin against colorful villains while such words as “POW!” and “BANG!” lit up the screen. Just as teh Superman movie franchise was dying a horrible death, Batman was brought to the silver screen by director Tim Burton, with Michael Keaton and Jack Nicholson giving memorable performances as Batman/Bruce Wayne and the Joker.

My favorite bat-film other than The Dark Knight, Batman had its music done by Burton’s regular composer-collaborator, Danny Elfman. It was this score that made Elfman one of the biggest composers of Hollywood, and also established him as on of the top choices for comic book movie music. Elfman was an excellent choice, his dark, impressionistic style of film-scoring a natural fit for Batman.

The music opens gloriously with “The Batman Theme”. It’s dashing and heroic, yet at the same time is imbued with a dark and sometimes tragic quality. This is my favorite superhero theme. I think John Williams’ Superman theme has a stronger opening titles arrangement, but Elfman’s theme just seems to have more dramatic energy as its quoted in the overall score. It is certainly a very malleable theme, and appears frequently, never failing to make a powerful statement. It made such an impression that it would be used for the opening and ending titles of the 90s’ animated series and in several video games and amusement parks.

A major factor in the score actually comes from Prince, who created his own collection of songs for the film on a separate soundtrack album. Many of these songs actually feature in the film, sometimes in an important way. Most important to the actual score is “Scandalous”. Elfman turns part of it into a love theme for Batman and love interest of the film Vicki Vale. The use of Prince songs also effects the material for the Joker. Since many of the Joker’s big scenes are backed by the songs, Elfman does not provide a strong overall theme. The closest he gets is “Waltz to the Death”, an awesome Gothic waltz for part of the final showdown that also dramatically closes out “Kitchen/Surgery/Face-Off”. You’d think the lack of a singular Joker theme would be a detriment, but Elfman pulls it off admirably.

After the main theme are “Roof Fight” and “First Confrontation”, two action cues which prove the effectiveness of the Batman theme. “Roof Fight” in particular sets the tone for several of the action pieces, traditional orchestra backed by urban percussion. “Flowers” is a melancholy track on piano and strings, while “Batman to the Rescue” is the most wild action cue. “Roasted Dude” is a short, haunting piece from one of the Joker’s monologues. “Photos/Beautiful Dreamer” is very atmospheric, and utilizes the tune from, as the title suggests, the 1864 song “Beautiful Dreamer”.

A definite highlight is “Descent into Mystery”. It kicks off with repeating strings, then a chanting choir. It builds into a short burst of the Batman theme and then introduces a secondary fanfare. This track is just epic, the best combination of heroism and atmosphere I’ve ever heard. Atmosphere of the more peaceful kind features in “The Bat Cave” and the carnivalesque “Joker’s Poem”. “Childhood Remembered” is an eerie piece on tragic strings for Bruce Wayne’s flashback scene.

The score’s final run is amazing, a series of big action and grand fanfares. “Charge of the Batmobile” and “Attack of the Batwing” fit in the former category, frenetic action music with the Batman theme liberally applied. “Up the Cathedral” is five minutes of dramatic darkness, with considerable use of an organ. This all builds into “Waltz to the Death”, literally an action waltz for its first half before a more subdued variation plays. “Final Confrontation” is the weakest of the final sequence tracks. It’s not bad. It’s pretty good. It just doesn’t have the wall-to-wall action of “Attack of the Batwing” or the uniqueness of the previous two tracks. It does end with a sweeping tragic motif and a final bit of circus music for the Joker. “Finale” brings back Batman’s fanfares in a big way, probably one of the best closing tracks one could wish for in a superhero movie. The last track is a reprise of the main theme from the end credits.

The original album has pretty much all the music you need, but there is a 2014 complete score release. It turns out all the score material fits onto one disc, since many of the scenes are backed by Prince songs. There is one  piece of music from the complete score I love called “Bat-Zone”, a slowly building iteration of the Batman theme.

Danny Elfman’s Batman is still the best Batman score, and in my opinion the best superhero score period. It’s got one of the best hero themes of all time, set the style for Elfman’s bigger action music throughout his career, has plenty of atmosphere, and even fits in with Prince’s songs.

Rating: 10/10

Tracklisting

  1. The Batman Theme (2:38)
  2. Rooftop Fight (1:20)
  3. First Confrontation (4:43)
  4. Kitchen/Surgery/Face-Off (3:07)
  5. Flowers (1:51)
  6. Clown Attack (1:45)
  7. Batman to the Rescue (3:56)
  8. Roasted Dude (1:01)
  9. Photos/Beautiful Dreamer (2:27)
  10. Descent into Mystery (1:31)
  11. The Bat Cave (2:35)
  12. The Joker’s Poem (0:56)
  13. Childhood Remembered (2:43)
  14. Love Theme (1:30)
  15. Charge of the Batmobile (1:41)
  16. Attack of the Batwing (4:44)
  17. Up the Cathedral (5:04)
  18. Waltz to the Death (3:55)
  19. Final Confrontation (3:47)
  20. Finale (1:45)
  21. Batman Theme Reprise (1:28)

Soundtrack Review: Tomorrow Never Dies

Conducted by: Nicholas Dodd

After the critical failure of Eric Serra’s Goldeneye score, the producers brought in David Arnold, who had just released his James Bond tribute Shaken Not Stirred, a collection of title songs and a few instrumentals redone by artists (regrettably this was in the 90s). John Barry was impressed with some of the reorchestrations Arnold did for the songs and recommended him. This turned out to a popular choice with Bond fans, and Arnold has the second most Bond scores under his belt.

David Arnold has been lauded for his ability to pay homage to John Barry while having his own style. Tomorrow Never Dies is singled out for its successful merging of orchestral and electronic elements. Arnold has received criticism for scoring most of the action cues with loud, multi-layered music, whereas most previous composers would take a more restrained approach, often leaving scenes unscored so that the sound effects could take over or to build suspense. This criticism of Arnold is true to a point. Some of the more basic fist fights could do with less noise instead of being scored to sound like climatic battles. But at least his music is highly enjoyable.

David Arnold also received criticism during the Brosnan years for his heavy use of the James Bond theme. Tomorrow Never Dies needed that theme, though, after Eric Serra almost ignored it in his work for Goldeneye. Plus Arnold never runs out of ways to use the theme. If he uses it to copious amounts, he at least provides a healthy dose of his own original themes and motifs. In addition to using the James Bond theme more heavily, he also uses From Russia with Love’s opening title motif, first in “White Knight” and then in a heroic burst in “Tricky Spot for 007”.

The album and title song situation for Tomorrow Never Dies was a mirror of what happened with Thunderball 25 years earlier, though the problems would be quickly rectified. Thanks to post-production issues, Arnold only had up to two-thirds of his score ready for the album release. Thankfully, fan demand would see a second album release several years later focused just on the score and containing all the highlights from the film’s last act.

Also as with John Barry and Thunderball, Arnold’s preferred song would be denied its presence over the opening titles. Instead, a contest of submitted songs would see Sheryl Crow get the honor. K.D. Lang’s song, which contains some of Arnold’s themes, would get to play in the ending credits. Crow’s “Tomorrow Never Dies” is not bad, even though it’s really hard to hear half of what she’s singing. There’s not as strong a melody and none of it is utilized in the score.

“Surrender”, on the other hand, provides three themes. The bombastic opening notes, in the vein of Goldfinger, serve as a secondary James Bond motif that is frequently paired with the James Bond theme. The tune for the verse is the film’s main theme and first appears towards the climax of “White Knight”. Aside from serving in the action cues, it can also be suspenseful (“Doctor Kaufmann”) and romantic (“Kowloon Bay”). In other words, it’s a perfect main title theme. The last theme is from the chorus and is most associated with Chinese agent Wai Lin (Michelle Yeoh). Since Yeoh’s character doesn’t appear much until the second half, this theme only appears briefly on the original album at the end of “Station Break”. It starts to take a more active role with “Helicopter Ride” and graces the climax of “All in a Day’s Work”.

Even outside of “Surrender” there are plenty of new themes. Bond girl Paris has her own love theme (“Paris and Bond”). The villains have their own theme as well. Unlike other Bond composers, Arnold is more consistent with providing themes for the villains. Carver’s theme has its first full appearance at the conclusion of “Sinking of the Devonshire”. It usually appears in a more subdued fashion, ironic for one of the more over-the-top baddies of the franchise. There’s a repeating, descending four-note motif in “Underwater Discovery” (and with a couple other brief references). It would crop up more often and less subtly as a suspense/action theme in Arnold’s later offerings. There is a tiny military motif that’s only represented on album at the end of “Tricky Spot for 007” and a somber motif for the Devonshire towards the end of “Sinking of the Devonshire” and in “Underwater Discovery”.

The first track from the score on the original album is the pre-titles “White Knight”. Arnold opts to score the Gunbarrel differently, starting with the rhythm rather than the opening fanfare. Right off the bat, listeners can tell this score will be big and bombastic, with plenty of references to the James Bond theme and the secondary Bond motif from “Surrender”. “Sinking of the Devonshire” takes a while to get going, but is nevertheless a strong track. It oddly features a few seconds of choir starting at the 5:04 mark. The choir never gets used again, which means he had to hire a few vocalists just for this tiny bit. It does help represent the tragedy befalling the British sailors.

Contrasting heavily with the somber and villainous music is “Company Car”, an awesome version of the James Bond theme infused with the secondary Bond motif. It’s all jazzy buildup until the last few, big brassy seconds. Things get quieter with “Paris and Bond” and “The Last Goodbye”. “Hamburg Break In” and “Hamburg Break Out” display a great handling of techno elements, never growing obnoxious and staying in the Bond style. “Doctor Kaufmann” is a neat piece, with its repeating four-note motif and truncated variation of the movie theme. “Backseat Driver” is an awesome techno track, with an assist from Propellerheads (There are at least three backseat driver jokes in this movie. Maybe the writer was dealing with some annoying children). It served as the action climax on the original album since the actual climax was not yet available. Ending the original album is a techno remix of the James Bond theme by Moby, with a couple film quotes from Tomorrow Never Dies and Goldfinger inserted.

The second album features all the score tracks from the original save “Station Break”. The new material starts with “Helicopter Ride”, a heavily techno-laden version of Wai Lin’s theme. “Bike Chase” is a lengthy chase cue with the usually heavy dosage of the James Bond theme. “Bike Shop Fight” starts with some East Asian instrumentation before a piano variation of Wai Lin’s theme and some more action music. “Kowloon Bay” is a romantic track featuring the main film theme and bits of Wai Lin’s theme. “Boarding the Stealth” is another action track, this one more restrained in references to the main themes. “Tricky Spot for 007” is mainly Carver’s theme before the James Bond theme triumphantly makes an appearance. “All in a Day’s Work” is a pounding finale, where halfway through the Bond theme breaks free. It ends with the best version of Wai Lin’s theme, an awesome finale for a great score.

Tomorrow Never Dies remains David Arnold’s best Bond score to date. It liberally uses the James Bond theme, but features plenty of its own great original themes. If you want the action side of James Bond music, this is the score to check out. It’s fun with nary a dull moment. This was a great revival for the franchise’s music after Serra’s unconventional and for many unlistenable Goldeneye. The only severe problem comes from the way the music was released. One would have to get his hands on both albums and put together all the tracks to get a full and complete listening experience (if you want to create a CD at least one track would have to be excised. I would recommend Moby’s remix). On another note, some of the DVD releases have the complete score, making it easy for people to rip it and place it online, so every bit of music can be found.

Rating: (score) 10/10 (original album) 6/10 (score-only album) 8/10

Tracklistings

Original Album

  1. Tomorrow Never Dies (performed by Sheryl Crow) (4:51)
  2. White Knight (8:30)
  3. Sinking of the Devonshire (7:07)
  4. Company Car (3:08)
  5. Station Break (3:30)
  6. Paris and Bond (1:55)
  7. The Last Goodbye (1:34)
  8. Hamburg Break In (2:52)
  9. Hamburg Break Out (1:26)
  10. Doctor Kauffman (2:26)
  11. 3-Send (1:17)
  12. Underwater Discovery (3:37)
  13. Backseat Driver (co-performed with Propellerheads) (4:37)
  14. Surrender (performed by K.D. Lang) (3:57)
  15. James Bond Theme by Moby (3:12)

 

Expanded Album

  1. White Knight (8:30)
  2. Sinking of the Devonshire (7:07)
  3. Company Car (3:08)
  4. Paris and Bond (1:55)
  5. The Last Goodbye (1:34)
  6. Hamburg Break In (2:52)
  7. Hamburg Break Out (1:26)
  8. Doctor Kauffman (2:26)
  9. 3-Send (1:17)
  10. Backseat Driver (co-performed with Propellerheads) (4:37)
  11. Underwater Discovery (3:37)
  12. Helicopter Ride (1:34)
  13. Bike Chase (6:44)
  14. Bike Shop (2:42)
  15. Kowloon Bay (2:27)
  16. Boarding the Stealth (4:38)
  17. Tricky Spot for 007 (2:48)
  18. All in a Day’s Work (5:09)
  19. Interview with David Arnold (11:02)

Soundtrack Review: Licence to Kill

Composed and Conducted by: Michael Kamen

After cold war thrillers and super-weapon plots, James Bond took a break to battle criminals in Licence to Kill. After drug lord Sanchez (played by Robert Davi), feeds Timothy Dalton Bond’s CIA friend Felix Leiter to the sharks, 007 goes on a hunt for revenge. A radical, dark departure, the movie did not necessarily bomb, but underperformed in America. Not helping was some tough summer competition from Batman and the latest installments of Star Trek and Indiana Jones. The James Bond series would go hiatus for six years, the longest break between entries it would ever experience, while the producers at Eon tried to take a step back and figure out a way to rejuvenate the franchise.

John Barry was going to score Licence to Kill, but had to step out due to throat surgery. Stepping in was Michael Kamen, who had scored many of the latest big-hit action films such as Lethal Weapon and Die Hard. The result is far from satisfying.

There are four songs on the album, a mixed bag. First is the title song “Licence to Kill” sung by Gladys Knight. It’s pretty good, and actually utilizes the first two notes of Goldfinger’s theme. It runs over five minutes, which meant it had to be edited down for the opening credits. Several Bond songs in the Brosnan and Craig eras would follow suit. For the end credits is “If You Asked Me To”, sung by Patti Labelle. I personally don’t care much for her voice, and I’m struggling to even remember how the song goes. Even less memorable is “Dirty Love”, a bland, mediocre song sung by Tim Freehan. “Wedding Party” is repetitious and also a bit bland despites its Caribbean flavor. So there’s one good song out of four.

Michael Kamen’s score does little to redeem the music. There’s about half an hour of material on the album, and it is edited with little rhyme or reason. The tracks feature two or three different cues spliced together. The score from the pre-title sequence is split between three tracks! This in itself would be somewhat forgivable if Kamen was able to deliver on the thematic material. Perhaps due to his being hired very late in production, he fails to incorporate “Licence to Kill”, which has a couple ready-made melodies. The only theme, at least the only recognizable one, is of course the James Bond theme, which does get some interesting variations.

Thanks to the film’s Latin American setting, there is some Latin music, primarily in the romantic “Pam”. The music for the Gunbarrel sequence (heard in “James & Felix on Their Way to Church”) is pretty interesting and cool, with violent orchestral blasts (that match the tone of the film), kicking things off before the James Bond theme arrives. The action and suspense material tends to veer into anonymity, with the occasional Spanish guitar riff or sharp orchestral strike to add at least a little character.

This is perhaps the worst James Bond soundtrack. It doesn’t suffer from disco or odd electronica like some of the other entries and doesn’t really hurt the movie, but three out of four songs and most of the score are forgettable. I tried to pay attention to the music when taking notes and found my mind drifting quite easily. Perhaps if John Barry was available the film would have been elevated and prevented James Bond’s longest absence from the big screen.

Rating: (score) 4/10 (album) 3/10

Tracklisting

  1. Licence to Kill (sung by Gladys Knight) (5:13)
  2. Wedding Party (sung by Ivory) (3:53)
  3. Dirty Love (sung by Tim Feehan) (3:45)
  4. Pam (3:50)
  5. If You Asked Me To (sung by Patti Labelle) (3:58)
  6. James & Felix on Their Way to Church (3:53)
  7. His Funny Valentine (3:26)
  8. Sanchez in the Bahamas/Shark Fishing (2:06)
  9. Ninja (6:03)
  10. Licence Revoked (9:11)